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Disclosure:  Recently, I had the opportunity to read The Athlete’s Cookbook so that I could write this book review.  I received the book for free in exchange for writing this book review.  This book review represents my honest opinions, findings, beliefs and experiences with The Athlete’s Cookbook. The views and opinions expressed in this book review are purely mine.

I have never been an athlete. I have never used the “A” word to describe myself. In fact, when I was in grade school, I avoided gym class like the plague. Now that I am on my journey of good health and fitness, I have been exploring new ways to live healthy and fit. As such, I was excited to have the opportunity to read The Athlete’s Cookbook. You never know. The “A” word as a descriptor may be in my future. Here’s some background on The Athlete’s Cookbook:

The Athlete’s Cookbook is a new health guide combining a carefully constructed nutritional program with personal training and conditioning. Build the ideal diet to power a lean, strong physique with over 100 delicious recipes, including Mussels Marinara Spaghetti for Increased Glycogen, Walnut-Parmesan Chicken for Maximum Protein, and Peanut Butter Crunch Bars for Healthy Fats. With day-by-day meal plans and advice on the best pre- and post-workout nutrition, The Athlete’s Cookbook details everything you need to maintain energy and build muscle.

The Athlete’s Cookbook contains three different programs targeted to three distinct goals: endurance, strength and body fat loss. Each program has its own meal plans, recipes, exercise and sports nutrition tips to help the reader achieve those goals.The Athlete's Cookbook

The Athlete’s Cookbook is organized into three main parts: Getting Started, The Nutritional Programs, and The Recipes. The Getting Started section gave me much-needed background information on the two authors, Corey Irwin and Brett Stewart. Knowing about the authors helped me to put the information that I was reading in context.  It is disappointing when an author lacks credibility with the subject matter of the book.  This is not the case with The Athlete’s Cookbook.

The Nutritional Programs section was my favorite because I have limited nutritional knowledge. I am in the early stages of increasing this aspect of my library. One drawback of the guide for me is that I do not exercise in the morning. The Meal Timing Schedules provided in each of the three programs presupposes an early morning workout. Because of that, I don’t know how effective any of the programs would be for me. I’m willing to arrange the program around an evening workout. We’ll see what develops.

Many of the recipes were intriguing. I plan to make some of the recipes from the fat loss program until I reach my goal weight. Then, I plan to incorporate the endurance and strength plans into my journey of good health and fitness.  The following is my favorite quote from the book.

Once we start viewing our food as part of the total preventative health package instead of as a temporary Band-Aid or short term ‘weight-loss aid’ that operates in its own separate orbit (often to the exclusion of all else, including our own health!), that’s when we truly begin to break out of our bubbles and connect the dots between our day-to-day habits and our long-term health prospects.

If you own this book or prepare the recipes from The Athlete’s Cookbook, please share your experiences with me.  Which recipes are your favorites?  You can leave a comment at the end of this post or on the Facebook fan page, Tweet me, or complete the form on the Contact page. Be blessed. Remain encouraged.

Min. Crystal L. Cochren
Disclosure:  Recently, I had the opportunity to read
The Athlete’s Cookbook so that I could write this book review.  I received the book for free in exchange for writing this book review.  This book review represents my honest opinions, findings, beliefs and experiences with The Athlete’s Cookbook. The views and opinions expressed in this book review are purely mine.